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 We had three amazing college students work with us to deliver the Girls in Science Camp at Green Street and serve as role models for the campers. This year, those young women were Stacy Uchendu, Anna Redgrave, and Mikaela Carty. In this five-part series, they share their experiences and favorite moments of the week.

Girls in Science Camp Reflection – “Before and After”

by Mikaela Carty

When Professor Othon, my advisor, offered me a job working with Girls In Science Camp, I got super excited. Well excited and a little hesitant. I was very honored that she asked but I was a little reluctant to accept Professor Othon’s offer because although I had taken two semesters of challenging physics, I did not fully feel equipped to lead experiments and lessons in this (physics) or any of the other subjects (being biology and chemistry). Professor Othon assured me that I would be right for the job and after consulting my mother I changed my departing ticket to a later date so that I could stay long enough to assist in the science camp.

P1160216I imagined that the girls would be young and anxious to learn about science. I imagined that they would draw male scientists when we asked them to do the “Draw a Scientist” assignment the first day. I imagined that they would forget to write in their journals and I and the other helpers would have to remind them to do so. I imagined my experience would be similar to dealing with myself when I was that age. I pictured shy, energetic, bright and inexperienced little girls.

However, what I imagined was different from the reality of my experience. For one, the girls were a lot more knowledgeable than I had expected. When they were asked to draw a scientist (at the start of the week) many of them drew females holding scientific paraphernalia rather than males. Without help from the professors, they were the ones who realized that if you place a lot of cherries on a scale then the scale would display a measurement and you could then divide that value by the number of cherries to calculate the weight of an individual cherry. I cannot believe that they knew that this was a method to try when your object is too light for a scale.

P1160150They are such bright children and their notes were wonderful. There was one girl that wrote notes that were so thorough I felt like she was already ready for college! I was very impressed with the students that participated in this camp. I believe that this is a sign that we are well on our way to a world where girls are just as prevalent as guys in the scientific fields.

It’s wonderful to see females being researchers and professors and mothers and knowing that we have the potential to be anything we set our hearts on. I am so grateful to have been part of this wonderful camp and I hope to continue and help propel the women in science movement.

We had three amazing college students work with us to deliver the Girls in Science Camp at Green Street and serve as role models for the campers. This year, those young women were Stacy Uchendu, Anna Redgrave, and Mikaela Carty. In this five-part series, they share their experiences and favorite moments of the week.

Girls in Science Camp Reflection Series – “Draw a Scientist Revelation”

by Stacy Uchendu

A really cool moment in the Girls in Science Camp is the revelation of how drastically the girls’ perceptions of scientists change from the beginning to the end of the week. At the beginning of the week, the girls were asked to draw a picture of a scientist and many of them drew “mad scientist” with hair standing on end, long lab coats and bright colored potions. By the end of the week, they were asked to draw a scientist again and this time all of the girls drew women in traditional lab settings, at home, with pets and children, doing their favorite hobbies, etc.IMG_1928

Their pictures showed how their perception of a scientist expanded from the male, mad scientist and diversified into intelligent, multi-faceted women with many interests and real lives. Their realization came as a result of interacting with a diverse range of women scientists and learning about their lives in and outside of lab, and I believe this change in perception will allow these girls to imagine themselves as future scientists as well.

We had three amazing college students work with us to deliver the Girls in Science Camp at Green Street and serve as role models for the campers. This year, those young women were Stacy Uchendu, Anna Redgrave, and Mikaela Carty. In this five-part series, they share their experiences and favorite moments of the week.

Girls in Science Camp Reflection – “Why I Wanted to Be a Part of the Camp”

P1160481by Anna Redgrave

I’m a fairly stubborn person. When someone tells me I should like something, it tends to make me more resistant to liking it. It isn’t until much later, sometimes years later, when I’m working hands-on with that same subject and coming up with all my own ideas about it that I think “hey, they were right!”

This has been my experience with education in general, but more specifically with science. Science was presented to me early in school as a subject that I should like. I got to formulate all my own questions and do my own experiments. The only trouble was that the questions and experiments we worked with in school were all given to us. There was no room to really think about anything, it was all just following directions and recording observations.

P1160267When I heard about the Girls in Science Camp I was thrilled because to me it represented a space outside of the often overwhelming school-in-session environment where girls could really delve into issues and ask their own questions. That kind of opportunity is something I could really have used as a kid, and I was excited to have a chance to help other girls develop an appreciation for science.

 

MasksPlease join us for the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center Registration Day and Open House this Thursday, August 20th from 12:00-5:00PM!

This will be an opportunity for parents to come in and ask questions, tour the facility, and learn more about Green Street and the Discovery AfterSchool and Wesleyan Bound programs.

Discovery AfterSchool (Grades 1-5)

Every year, the Discovery AfterSchool Program at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center offers a range of classes in the arts, sciences, and math for children in Grades 1- 5. http://www.wesleyan.edu/greenstreet/youth/afterschoolclasses.html

Our AfterSchool team is made up of our core education staff, professional instructors, and Wesleyan University Students who serve as instructors, teaching assistants, and homework tutors. We pride ourselves in being able to offer such a diverse group of role models with a wide range of backgrounds and expertise to the children in the program.

The Program is flexible for busy schedules. Children can be sent for five days a week or for one specific class of interest once a week. They can also be signed up for homework time where we have college student tutors available to get them started with their homework for the day.

Classes Offered

Grades 3-5: African Drumming, Art and Math – Young Masters, Art and Science, Art Around the World, Ballet Technique, Beginning Step Dance, Capoeira, Improv Comedy, Intermediate Breakdancing, Intermediate Hip Hop, Kids in the Kitchen, Make Your Own Book, Musical Mentoring, Science Club, Simply Stylin’ Fashion Design

The cost of each class is $150 and each day of homework help is $75 for the fall semester. To calculate the total cost, you multiply those fees by the total number of days the child will attend. Financial assistance and payment plans are available for free and reduced lunch families and those who otherwise qualify. We don’t want to keep any child away from these opportunities so if you think our classes would be beneficial, talk to us about how we can help.

Wesleyan Bound (Grades 6-8)

Wesleyan Bound is a unique after school class for middle school students (Grades 6-8) based at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center in Middletown, CT. http://www.wesleyan.edu/greenstreet/youth/AfterSchool%20Wesleyan%20Bound%20.html

The class exposes middle school students to the holistic college experience – so much more than academics and admission tours. Each week, students visit the Wesleyan University campus for a wide range of activities like workshops with students groups, talks with professors, tours of science laboratories, and guided visits of art galleries.

The class is co-taught by two Wesleyan University students who coordinate a wide range of activities for the middle schoolers. Past activities have including a step dance workshop with the WeStep student club, baking cupcakes at a student program house (a residential option at Wesleyan where students with similar interests can live together), digging up artifacts at an anthropology site, meeting with the rugby team, touring the theater department behind the scenes, and so much more.

Wesleyan Bound will take place on Friday afternoons this fall from September 18th – December 11th with a student showcase on the last day. Students arrive at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center around 3:00pm for a 3:15pm class time.

The class is shuttled to the Wesleyan University campus for their activities and brought back to Green Street for a 5:15pm dismissal. Parents are responsible for pick up.

The cost of the class is $300 for the fall semester. Financial assistance is available for free and reduced lunch families.

Do these programs sound like something your child would enjoy? If so, please join us on Thursday!

A Stand of Acacia_Oil on Panel_30x30inches Since 2008, Kathi’s work has focused almost exclusively on images of wildlife that she photographed while in Africa. After many years of painting the figure in situations that explored the human imprint on nature, Kathi turned to animal imagery to tell this compelling story from a different perspective. Each encounter with nature gave Kathi an untold appreciation for the interdependence of species.

Wildlife, especially large mammals, is endlessly fascinating to observe. Drawing and painting from photography has allowed Kathi the emotional distance that she needed to escape verisimilitude. When facts recede into the background, her memory, imagination and pictorial concerns take precedence.

Migration No.2_Oil on Panel_30x30inchesKathi is reminded of Cezanne’s statement that “all systems are artificial” and an artist “deals with the tension between what is seen and the constructions made of it”. Kathi uses color, composition and space to create an effect of nature and what is experienced, not a copy of it.

Packer’s exhibit, Memory and Harbinger will be on display from September 3rd-23rd with an opening reception on Thursday, September 3rd from 5-8:00p.m.

The Green Street Center for Teaching and Learning is located at 51 Green Street, Middletown, CT.

The gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9a.m.-3p.m.

In addition, Green Street will be hosting an artist talk on Monday, September 21st from 12-1pm featuring Kathi Packer.

Flyer image 2In conjunction with the Middletown Art Walk, The Green Street TLC will be hosting a very special photo exhibit featuring Middletown resident, Hannah Vecchitto.

Hannah is a 15 year old Middletown High School student and leukemia survivor. With the help of the Make-a-Wish Foundation Hannah received the gift of a lens from Nikon; a Mac computer with photo-editing software; photography lessons, and photo editing lessons.  In Addition, we at The Green Street Teaching and Learning Center offered Hannah the opportunity to exhibit her work in our upstairs gallery space.

After a year of snapping photos Hannah is ready to share with the public what the world looks like through her eyes.

Please join us on Thursday, August 6th at 5pm for the opening reception of the “The little things” exhibit.

The Green Street Teaching and Learning Center is located at 51 Green Street, Middletown, CT.
The gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9a.m.-3p.m. The gallery will close at noon on Fri., Aug. 7th.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Matt Low is a Brooklyn, NY-based photographer whose crisp, concise, and often calligraphic imagery packs a poignant punch as demonstrated in this show of powerful and poetic photographs of beach debris entitled Persistence at the Green Street Center for Teaching and Learning of Wesleyan University.

Greatly disturbed by the growing profusion of plastic detritus he observed washing up onto our beaches, Low began to photograph the vast assortment of forms he encountered while walking the shoreline.  Individually, each of these bits of beach debris appeared nothing more than expended and mundane.  But by astutely arranging and juxtaposing natural ocean remnants with cast off, man-made plastic forms, Matt Low initiates a powerful poetic and/or political discourse within each of these photographs he presents.   Persistence, a captivating photographic narrative– both delightful and dire– is not to be missed.

Low’s exhibit, Persistence will be on display from August 6th-27th with an opening reception on Thursday, August 6th from 5-8:00p.m.

The Green Street Center for Teaching and Learning is located at 51 Green Street, Middletown, CT.

The gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9a.m.-3p.m. The gallery will close at noon on Fri., Aug. 7th.

Origami Workshop

OrigamiWorkshopFlyerBen Parker thoughtfully and skillfully challenges the cliché notion of origami as merely the art of cleverly crafting amusing paper animals.  Ben’s workshop will teach students the art of the fold and how to break some of the rules associated with traditional origami.
Workshop Date: Wednesday, June 24th from 3:30 – 5:30 PM

The workshop cost is $15.00 per person

To register please call us at 860-685-7871 or email us at gsac@wesleyan.edu

N_Eisenfeld_Ice_During the month of July, the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center will be exhibiting the work of North Haven artist, Nancy Eisenfeld.  This show of her newest work entitled,  On the Diagonal  will highlight her recent exploration of the emotive power of diagonal line.  Alive with the energy and movement of the diagonals which she uses to both construct and dissect their richly layered surfaces, Eisenfeld’s oil stick paintings and glass collages are the serendipitous results of the intuitive experimentation that is integral to her process.  With open-ended, poetic titles like Ice and Angled Light these striking textural wall works provide access and intrigue for the viewer, while offering plenty of room for reflection and personal interpretation.

The exhibit will open on Thursday, July 2nd from 5-8:00p.m. in conjunction with the Middletown ArtWalk series.  On the Diagonal will run from July 2nd through July 29th.  The gallery hours are Monday-Thursday 9a.m.-5p.m. and Fridays 9a.m.-noon (closed on July 3rd for the 4th of July holiday).

Bulb Tessellation, Folded Paper, 24x18, 2014 In his series, Breaking the Pattern, that will be on display at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center of Wesleyan University from June 4th through June 24th, Ben Parker thoughtfully and skillfully challenges the cliché notion of origami as merely the art of cleverly crafting amusing paper animals.

Parker’s aesthetic clearly affirms his affinity for pattern, precision and problem-solving–  all of which are inherent to the mathematics that underly his works and that are in keeping with the Green Street’s overarching theme of science and math.  He exquisitely explores and manipulates a much broader range of hand-folded patterns, designs, and surface textures than one would typically associate with the traditional craft of origami. The works in this show gracefully embody Parker’s contemplative, uniquely personal, and contemporary approach to the ancient art of origami.

This extraordinary exhibit will open on Thursday, June 4th from 5-8:00p.m. in conjunction with the Middletown Art Walk series— and will be a delight for crafters, as well as fine art aficionados.

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